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CH MISHA TICA AND CFA

 CH MISHA NIKOLAS
THE SON OF CH NIKY 





CH MARGO

SWEET PERSONALITY AND GREAT MAMA CAT





CH SOFIA

LOVELY PRECIOUS  GIRL  

WITH BIG HEART

 A magnificent,  wild-looking cat, the Siberian is an excellent hunter and is well  adapted to surviving in a climate of extreme temperatures. Little is  known of its background, but some people think that it is one of the  earliest longhaired breeds. This intelligent, bold breed is a large cat  with a modified wedge shaped head with rounded contours and very  expressive eyes. They have heavy boning with a muscular build and a  barrel shaped torso. Their ability to be very agile is great as their  back legs are slightly longer than their front legs. This gives them the  ability to jump great heights.
According to Russian cat fanciers,  the true Siberian is exported with a metrika (Russian pedigree) seal and  specific signatures from a recognized registry and member breeder.  Russian breeders report that some lines have a predisposition towards  umbilical hernias, a problem that can be surgically repaired. Kinked  tails are occasionally found, but do not affect the well being of the  cat.
The Siberian's were recorded as participants in the first cat  show in England in the 1700's and have been judged to Grand  International Championship overseas prior to their export. Old Soviet  law discouraged pet ownership due to the housing and food shortages and  war depleted representatives of various purebreds. It was only in 1987  that the Russian Cat Clubs (recognized as individual registries there)  began to keep official records in an attempt to retrieve what had been  proscribed or lost. On June 28, 1990, the first Siberian's were imported  to the USA  Considered by some to be the ancestor  all  long haired cats.  Can take up to five years before the cat matures to full size.
                  Considered to be the largest domestic breed in the world.
                            Known to have an amazing jumping ability.  

KING RETIRED CH NICKOLAS

 CH NIKY JORG  Niky(Nicolas)  is purebred Siberian cat. At the age of 4 months he crossed the ocean  and flew from Moscow Russia to Virginia USA. Two months later he  attended his first show in kitten's category. He won a champion ship  right away in big competition. In 2005 Niky won again, an adult  championship title this time. He is  even tempered, very loving, and  loyal. 

SIBERIANS

 Many people who have allergic reactions around cats have found that they are not allergic to this breed.
The  Siberian is a physically affectionate cat, and loves attention, they  are also loyal, protective of their humans, sociable and confident.  These cats have also been known to give their owners love bites. Being a  mellow breed they make great companions. They are happy to share your  lap and bed (usually your pillow) with you. The Siberian is a very  intelligent breed, that learns quickly, and even seem to "problem solve"  to get what they want. They seem to have some dog-like qualities.  Siberians love purring but also squeak and chirp, they love to be spoken  to and will come running when they hear their names. The eyes seem to  speak to you when you look at them, they are very expressive. They also  love to play in the water, water bowls and dripping kitchen sinks.
The  Siberian cat comes only as a longhair. Although brown tabby is the most  common colour, it may be any pattern or colour or combination of  colours, solid lilac or solid chocolate - some Cat Organizations do not  accept the colorpoints for judging. With their triple coat the longer  hairs are pale near the skin, darkening toward the outer end. This makes  the coat shimmer as the cat moves. 

CATS HELP

 Cats Help Shield Owners From Heart Attack
Study finds 30% risk reduction when felines are in the home
By E.J. Mundell, HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY,  Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Whether it's a frisky kitten or a tubby  tabby, a cat at home could cut your heart attack risk by almost a third,  a new study suggests.
The finding, from a 10-year study of more than  4,300 Americans, suggests that the stress relief pets provide humans is  heart-healthy.
And dog lovers shouldn't feel left out: Although the  study found no such benefit from "man's best friend," that's probably  because there simply weren't enough dog owners in the study to draw firm  conclusions, the researchers said.
"For years we have known that  psychological stress and anxiety are related to cardiovascular events,  particularly heart attacks," noted study senior author Dr. Adnan  Qureshi, executive director of the Minnesota Stroke Institute at the  University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.
According to Qureshi, the new  research shows that "essentially there is a benefit in relieving those  inciting factors from pets."
He was slated to present the findings  Thursday at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke  Conference in New Orleans.
The stress-cardiovascular disease link is  well-documented in scientific literature, and the affection and pleasure  pets give humans is a known stress-buster. In fact, one study presented  in 2005 at an American Heart Association meeting found that a single  12-minute visit with a dog improved the heart and lung function of  people with heart failure.
In the new study, Qureshi's team analyzed  data on 4,435 Americans, aged 30 to 75, who took part in the federal  government's second National Health and Nutrition Examination Study,  which ran from 1976-1980. According to the data in the survey, 2,435 of  the participants either owned a cat or had owned a cat in the past,  while the remaining 2,000 had never done so.
Qureshi's team then tracked rates of death from all causes, including heart and stroke.
Cat  owners "appeared to have a lower rate of dying from heart attacks" over  10 years of follow-up compared to feline-free folk, Qureshi said.
The  magnitude of the effect -- a 30 percent reduction in heart attack risk  -- "was a little bit surprising," he added. "We certainly expected an  effect, because we thought that there was a biologically plausible  mechanism at work. But the magnitude of the effect was hard to predict."
Qureshi  -- proud owner of his own feline, Ninja -- stressed that dogs probably  would bring people the same kind of benefit, but the numbers of dog  owners in the study wasn't big enough to count statistically.
Kathie  Cole, a clinical nurse at the UCLA Medical Center and School of Nursing  and the lead author of the 2005 dog-and-heart-failure study, said she  wasn't surprised by the Minnesota findings.
"I would be inclined to  think that any animal that is perceived as meaningful to a person in a  positive way would have health benefits," Cole said. She pointed to  multiple studies that have found that animal companions "have a calming  effect in regard to mental stressors."
Both researchers believe pet  ownership should be perceived as a low-cost, low-risk medical  intervention that can potentially save or extend lives, especially for  the elderly. "The problem right now is that so many apartment buildings  or nursing homes aren't allowing animals in," Cole said. "That's the  problem I see from a community standpoint."
Qureshi agreed that cats, dogs or other pets may bring tangible medical benefits to owners.
"This  opens a whole new avenue or intervention that we hadn't looked at  before, one that can be made at the public level," he said. And unlike  drugs or surgery, pet ownership "doesn't appear to have any risks to  it," he added.

There's information on responsible pet ownership at the American Veterinary Medical Association  

ATTENTION!!! NO COLOR POINT, LYNX COLOR KITTENS

 WERE BORN OR PLAN TO be born

THE PRIMARY COLORS ARE:  MACKERELLTABBY, MAC TABBY, BROWN TABBY WITH OR WITHOUT MACKERELL, BLACK TABBY WITH WHITE, RED TABBY (BOYS ONLY) 

  kittens colors